A Sketchy Federal Circuit Holding on a Converse Trade Dress ITC Proceeding

In 2013, the USPTO issued U.S Trademark Registration 4,398,753 to Nike subsidiary Converse, Inc. The registration covered the Converse Chuck Taylor All Star midsole stripes, toe cap, and multilayered toe bumper featuring diamonds and line patterns, which Converse claims to have been selling since 1946.  In October 2014, Converse filed a complaint with the ITC … Continue reading A Sketchy Federal Circuit Holding on a Converse Trade Dress ITC Proceeding

How can a Business Provide a Description of What it is Selling While Having a Unique Brand?

“There’s been a dust up in town,” my mother told me on my last trip home. A local restaurant had started getting calls for reservations and customers wandering in looking for their newly formed competition. The customers were confused, as the two restaurants had similar names. This seems like a pretty straight forward trademark story, … Continue reading How can a Business Provide a Description of What it is Selling While Having a Unique Brand?

“Show-Me” the (Vegan) Meat! Missouri’s Foray into Meat Advertising Law

“I come from a state that raises corn and cotton and cockleburs,” Missouri Congressman Willard Duncan Vandiver told a U.S. Navy banquet in 1899. “[F]rothy eloquence neither convinces nor satisfies me. I am from Missouri. You have got to show me.” This is one of the sayings credited for making Missouri known as the “Show-Me” … Continue reading “Show-Me” the (Vegan) Meat! Missouri’s Foray into Meat Advertising Law

“Made in America” – Don’t Claim it Unless You Can Prove it

Consumers love to “buy American.”  It stands to reason, then, that consumer products companies love to market their products as “Made in America.” Recent settlements between the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and three different companies illustrate the danger of advertising a product as American-made without proof that the product is, in fact, manufactured in America. … Continue reading “Made in America” – Don’t Claim it Unless You Can Prove it

Part II: Losing Credibility Through Selfie Certification

This post builds from a previous post on certifications, titled Credibility Through Certification – UL Standards & Selfie Certifications. That post sought to address the use of UL certifications.  This post takes a closer look at how the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is cracking down on those companies dubbing their products (and services) as leaders … Continue reading Part II: Losing Credibility Through Selfie Certification

%d bloggers like this: